For the Criminally Inane

For the Criminally Inane

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Communication: The more you have the less you have

I've made an interesting observation lately.  We have so many ways to communicate Facebook messaging, phone, snail mail, email, Twitter, texting, so many in fact that it's becoming hard to communicate with people.  What? you say.  Doesn't that seem oxymoronic?  (My spell check says that's not a word, but I'm going to go with it.)  But listen to me.  Most people have a preferred method of communication, their habit.  I have one friend who said he only does Twitter--email, even texting is so passe for him.  If you want to communicate with him you better #bepreparedtotellthewholeworld.  My elderly friends all use their home phone, eschew email to perhaps a once a week activity (REALLY!) and don't text.  (You mean I have to dial a phone number to reach you?) The younger generation, I have no idea how best to communicate with them.  Do I leave a Facebook message?  Do you have a Facebook page?  Text?  Do your parents let you have a phone?  No? Text the parents?  Call the home?  Does anyone respond to their home voicemail messages anymore?  Call their parent's cell?  I could probably write a letter and they'd get it, but I'm not sure I'd get a response.  At any rate, communication has become more complicated because now we have to ask which is their preferred method of communication and hope it aligns with yours.

Sunday, August 4, 2013

So you're watching Downton Abbey...

I guess the Edwardian Era is all the rage.  Well, if you are a fan of the new electric light, telephones attached to the walls and cars that max at 20 or so mph, you've got to read stuff by P.G. Wodehouse.  He invented the hilarious duo of Jeeves and Wooster.  Bertie Wooster is a wealthy bachelor who is constantly getting into scrapes, often involving fiancees, former fiancees, overbearing aunts, dogs and old school chums.  Jeeves is his valet, his man servant known for his expertise in the human "psychology" and problem solving skills.  Reading "Just Enough Jeeves" has had me laughing out loud and if you enjoy smart humor, the Edwardian Era, you'll love his stuff.